The Roman Socrates   Leave a comment


 

the_roman_socrates

11 – How do you think I can work with that row going on?’ An affectionate laugh accompanies the reply ‘Is it as bad as that! As far as I’m concerned, so long as they keep free from sin, they can chop wood on my back if they feel like it.’

29 – a home in which he remained as long as possible since it gave him the greatest possible freedom of movement, and because it gave him all he wanted: a position that just kept him from dying of hunger.

30 – his food, a daily handful of corn and olives;…

30 – At the end of his life the last spiritual book he had read to him was The Fathers of the Desert, a book he always considered a manual of perfection;…

40 – the pilgrims themselves, their devotion having made them vagabonds, resembled tramps rather than the devout tourists whom we call pilgrims today.

72 – the Philippian ideal; neither speeches nor arguments can awaken a living faith in those for whom Christianity has lost its meaning.

75 – It was the most difficult thing in the world to persuade him to take a little rest, delegate some of his duties or add something to a diet which made that of a Trappist, by comparison, seem positively festive.

75 – It is a mystery how he could spend so long there in winter without freezing to death.

83 – Such things were of almost daily occurrence, and were so well known that one of his younger disciples, when tempted to sin, was able to resist by merely saying to himself, ‘No, Father Philip would know at once.’

85 – he sent Baronius to a wineshop to sample all the wines before buying half a bottle; to make it all the worse he had to offer a gold piece in payment and ask for change.

87 – The only antidote to the deadly seriousness into which pride can lead us is, when all is said and done, the joyful simplicity of the children of God.

The Roman Socrates
by Rev. Louis Bouyer
Translated by Michael Day

Posted March 23, 2015 by Mr. Merrick in Books, Saints

Tagged with , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: