Archive for the ‘Priest’ Tag

The Roman Socrates   Leave a comment


 

the_roman_socrates

11 – How do you think I can work with that row going on?’ An affectionate laugh accompanies the reply ‘Is it as bad as that! As far as I’m concerned, so long as they keep free from sin, they can chop wood on my back if they feel like it.’

29 – a home in which he remained as long as possible since it gave him the greatest possible freedom of movement, and because it gave him all he wanted: a position that just kept him from dying of hunger.

30 – his food, a daily handful of corn and olives;…

30 – At the end of his life the last spiritual book he had read to him was The Fathers of the Desert, a book he always considered a manual of perfection;…

40 – the pilgrims themselves, their devotion having made them vagabonds, resembled tramps rather than the devout tourists whom we call pilgrims today.

72 – the Philippian ideal; neither speeches nor arguments can awaken a living faith in those for whom Christianity has lost its meaning.

75 – It was the most difficult thing in the world to persuade him to take a little rest, delegate some of his duties or add something to a diet which made that of a Trappist, by comparison, seem positively festive.

75 – It is a mystery how he could spend so long there in winter without freezing to death.

83 – Such things were of almost daily occurrence, and were so well known that one of his younger disciples, when tempted to sin, was able to resist by merely saying to himself, ‘No, Father Philip would know at once.’

85 – he sent Baronius to a wineshop to sample all the wines before buying half a bottle; to make it all the worse he had to offer a gold piece in payment and ask for change.

87 – The only antidote to the deadly seriousness into which pride can lead us is, when all is said and done, the joyful simplicity of the children of God.

The Roman Socrates
by Rev. Louis Bouyer
Translated by Michael Day

Posted March 23, 2015 by Mr. Merrick in Books, Saints

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The Diary of a Country Priest   Leave a comment


 

Diary of a Country Priest (cover)

19,20 – Poor blokes! They’ve worn everything threadbare – even sin. You can’t have a “good time” just because you want to. The shabbiest tupenny doll will rejoice a baby’s heart for half the year, but your mature gentleman’ll go yawning his head off at a five-hundred franc gadget. Any why? Because he has lost the soul of childhood.

22 – Beasts have few needs and these never vary, whereas human beings-!

26 – After all, they aren’t to blame if weekly visits to the pictures now supplement a precocious realization of sex, inevitably acquired from animals. By the time their lips could first have shaped it, the word ‘love’ had already become a thing to ridicule, a dirty thing to be hunted with shouts of laughter, and stones, much as they treat toads.

51 – …I often think of the Russians with a strange sort of inquisitiveness and tenderness. If one has known real poverty, its joys, mysterious, incommunicable – Russian writers can bring tears to the eyes.

51 – …I used to do my homework squatting behind the bar on the floor-that is to say a few rotting boards. The dank reek of earth came up between them, earth which was always wet, the reek of mud. On pay-nights our customers didn’t even go outside to relieve themselves; they would pass water where they stood, and I was so terrified, crouching behind the bar, that in the end I’d fall asleep.

55,56 – ‘Teach it to the poor?’ I whispered. ‘Ay, to the poor. God sends us to them first, and what is our message? Poverty.

61,62 – You’ve been holding forth against this woman today who has just bathed My feet with very expensive nard, as though My poor people had no right to the best scent. You’re obviously one of those folk who give a ha’penny to a beggar and then hold up their hands in horror if they don’t see him scurry off at once to the nearest baker’s to stuff himself with yesterday’s stale bread, which the canny shopkeeper will in any case have sold him as fresh. In his place those people would do just as he did: they’d go straight to the nearest pub. A poor man with nothing in his belly needs hope, illusion, more than bread. You fool!

103 – I know, of course, that the wish to pray is a prayer in itself, that God can ask no more than that of us.

104 – We take psychiatrists’ word for it. The unanimous testimony of saints is held as of little or no account.

135 – One can deceive a daughter just as well as a wife. It’s not the same. It’s worse.

154,155 – In those days I was still young and much admired. When you know you’re attractive, that whenever you choose you can love and be loved, it isn’t difficult to be virtuous, at least not for women like me. Mere pride is enough to keep us straight.

159 – What does family prestige matter to God, or dignity or culture, if it’s all no more than a silk shroud on a rotting corpse?’

184 – Why, look at my face,’ I said. ‘Surely if our Lord created it for anything, He made it to be slapped, and it hasn’t been slapped yet.’

188 – When I think of my daily fare, which would not satisfy a pauper, I find somewhat irritating this general amazement at my drinking anything besides water.

209 – ‘Keep at the little daily things that need doing, till the rest comes. Concentrate. Think of a lad at his homework, trying so hard and his tongue sticking out. That’s how Our Lord would have us be when He gives us up to our own strength.

235 – …-God, it all seems simple enough now! I was never young because no one wanted to be young with me.

244 – Injustice sustained at the exact degree of necessary tension to turn the cogs of the huge machine-for-the-making-of-rich-men, without bursting the boiler.

245 – ‘Soldiers? Call’em “army-men.” The last real soldier died on May 30th, 1431, and you killed her, you people.

259 – Keep silent, what a strange expression! Silence keeps us.

289,290 – “There be nothin’ so endurin’ as a woman,” she’d say, “she don’t go to bed till she be dyin’.”

The Diary of a Country Priest

by Georges Bernanos

Posted February 18, 2015 by Mr. Merrick in Books

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